Stories from Inside: Part 11

March 24, 2014 in Corrections, Justice, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

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“How does having ADHD effect me while being in the justice system

Being in prison is harder for people with (A.D.H.D.) then for people with out because of the daily things that goes on in a prison life. Like for instance you are going to have people test you not only other inmates but also CO’s. And its hard to keep your kool if you have (ADHD.) You have to worrie about trying to get on the phone with out fighting and then once you finaly get on the phone the COcalls count or shake down shows up and you have to lock in your cell. I was incarcerated on Aug 7, 2012. I was locked in a POD ment to house 40 inmates, with 60 inmates on the POD. I was locked in a one man cell to share with two other inmates. There were only 2 beds so I had no choice but to sleep on the floor 2 feed from the comode.

The conditions were terrible there was mold bugs, several mice and out brakes of Mersia. We had 3 phones for 60 inmates to use with only 2 hours of free time out of our cells a day, It took over 100 days to be indicted, 8 ½ months untill I was sentenced and an additional 2 months befor I was moved from the presentenced side of the prison that’s a total of 14 months in these conditions.

So if you come to jail and you have a mental illness like Bypolar or ADHD making it threw these types of conditions is almost impossible. And on top of all this you are worried about your family and all the other things on the outside like bills, truck, boat, house, and the reality of losing so much is hard to deal with.”

Stories from Inside 10: “Love Magnified”

March 17, 2014 in Corrections, Justice, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

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“Love Magnified

This is for my people, so close an understanding
Victims of this world & all of its demanding
Our voices are small to them becuz of a small mind
I promise that a normal one
among them is a rare to find
Everyone is not conscious like us
but seeing is believing
Beware of the phonies who always relish in deceiving
Remember that time? Yeah! When everyone was staring?
Actin very concerned but never really caring?
Those are the ones! Just bounce them from your mental
The fakes are spitting lies & its coming from their dental
Still the focus is on us becuz we’re too much to handle
Too real! With the ability to put diplomas on the mantle
I know its easier to hurt then to deal with the new
But things can be different I swear, I promise you!
OK! Things happend & things aren’t like they used to be
Let’s put our hearts our feelings out there so they can see
We use this for strength to build & make us strong
Then we step out like royalty after we’ve forgiven the wrong
at night when alone we ask ourselves, is it really worth it?
To hold on to some B.S. when we couldn’t even help it?
The anger, sadness, dark clouds & the pouring rain
No! Our tears means something it’s the hurt & pain!
So what they know now, they won’t be able to judge us
It’s not our fault! There’s no need to fuss!
We got this, can you call off the so called “sanctified”
Becuz we are living proof- that everything is magnified!”

Stories from Inside: Part 9

March 10, 2014 in Corrections, Justice, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

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“Through attending these (A.D.H.D. – groups), I’ve learned alot of different ways to cope with my A.D.H.D. For instance, just knowing that I am not alone & that I have resources available to help me if needed. I feel very fortunate to have had the opportunity to be given the information to help me upon my release from this hellacious place I put myself in.

Having a release of thoughts in my head with other people who have the same (A.D.H.D. symptoms) I have, really helps me. I also realized also that I will probably find A.D.H.D. groups when I get home to help me, as far as venting to other is concerned”

Stories from Inside: Part 8

March 3, 2014 in Corrections, Justice, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

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“Hi my name is [KM] and I have been diagnosed with ADHD while being incarcerated at the Howard R. Young Correctional facility. Since being diagnosed and participating in a 8 week class I have learned a lot. I have learned how to process my ADHD and also what certain symptoms to look for. The most important thing I have learned is that my ADHD has hindered my success a little by not making important notes, which led to my forgetting certain things.”

Stories from Inside: Part 7

February 24, 2014 in Corrections, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

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“My name is [JC] and as a child growing up my behavior was consistent with ADHD. I was in the Terry Psychiatric Center for Children when I was 9 years old as an inpatient. I received riddelin daily for my attitude and behaviors. After 18 months I was released and since then I have not used any medication for my ADHD. During my years as a teen I became involved in criminal behavior which eventually led to me being incarcerated continually. When I became an adult my behaviors progressed and prison became my second home. Each time I was released I either couldn’t focus on my goals I set or I hyper focused on the wrong things (crime) and it became an ongoing cycle. I’ve just recently completed the ADHD Corrections Project, a class for incarcerated men diagnosed with ADHD. I now realize how I was affected by ADHD and that my whole life I developed coping skills to deal with my ADHD. But overall, its an ongoing issue in my life today. I’ve learned new ways to deal with it properly and upon my release I plan to utilize the support provided for people with ADHD. Had I known that ADHD played a part in my continuous display of disregard for the law it would’ve allowed me to seek the help I needed in order to maintain control of my life. Now that I’ve been enlightened I feel confident that I will succeed.”

Stories from Inside: Part 6

February 17, 2014 in Corrections, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

7“Hi, my name is —  and I’m nineteen years old. I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was about nine years old. My parents were concerned about my behavior during school. I used to get in trouble in school for fighting, talking during class, and other things like being hyper. I’m from Philly, also known as Philadelphia. There my parents took me to a doctor to see if they could figure out what was wrong with me, and why I was misbehaving in school. The doctor said I had symptoms of having Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. From then on both of my parents took me to a therapist company known as PATH and I was placed on medication for my ADHD. I continued going to PATH until I was thirteen: I then moved to Delaware. I began getting in trouble once again, but this time I was involved for selling drugs. A habit that has continued until I was eighteen years old, leading to my incarceration. I’ve learned so much from being in jail and from the ADHD program. There are ways to improve on my behaviors, I have learned better decision-making skills, being aware, and planning for my future. I was attending — College, and I plan on continuing to go back to school, real estate school, and becoming an entrepreneur. I have embraced my attention deficit hyperactive disorder and gained a lot of knowledge about it and myself and I am a better person now. I’m thankful for the opportunity I got from ADHD.”

Stories from Inside: Part 5

February 10, 2014 in Corrections, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

SFI5“When I was in school I was disruptive, even though I got good grades I was always in trouble for acting out. When I got older I started to self-medicate starting with pot then moving on to harder drugs. I always dismissed any symptoms of ADHD as being cause by my drug addiction. In the long run my drug addiction brought me to prison, which I believe was an indirect cause of my ADHD.” 

Stories from Inside: Part 4

February 4, 2014 in Corrections, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

sfi4a“Having ADHD can be very hard on a person. I have ADHD, and I’ve known it for a long time, since I was about 6 or 7 years old. I used to take medicine for it but as I got older I stopped taking it. Since I have been in prison and have been getting help through this ADHD group counseling it has been helping me a lot.”

Stories from Inside: Part 3

January 27, 2014 in Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

 

Aviary Photo_130345338035518968“I believe ADHD has played a negative role in my life. I think it wrecked my career and possibly my marriage. ADHD could have ruined my completing the Head Start Home program in prison. I truly believe some of the tools I’ve learned in the DOJ. ADHD class is the only reason I will graduate this program. I was having a very hard time with the program until I started taking ADHD class. I use some of the tools daily and for many aspects of my day. I have since been officially been diagnosed with ADHD and intend to follow up with treatment after my release.”

Stories from Inside: Part 2

January 20, 2014 in Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

SFI3“I think ADHD has affected me in ways that I never knew. First if it wasn’t for me getting tested, I would have never known that I had it. Now that I know, a seen the symptoms, I see that I had it for a very long time. So I think it affected me in a way that brought me here [to prison]. My thinking and lack of awareness had a part of it. Because of the fact that my anger played a big part in it, I think if had controlled it I wouldn’t have got myself in the predicament that I’m in.

The way the DOC has affected me is that being here I’ve learned to control my anger as well as my disruptive thoughts. I tend to think irrational a lot a I need to start controlling that. In here I have become or shall I say I see that I’m hyperactive at times. Sometimes I can control it and other times I can’t”