Stories from Inside: Part 7

February 24, 2014 in Corrections, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

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“My name is [JC] and as a child growing up my behavior was consistent with ADHD. I was in the Terry Psychiatric Center for Children when I was 9 years old as an inpatient. I received riddelin daily for my attitude and behaviors. After 18 months I was released and since then I have not used any medication for my ADHD. During my years as a teen I became involved in criminal behavior which eventually led to me being incarcerated continually. When I became an adult my behaviors progressed and prison became my second home. Each time I was released I either couldn’t focus on my goals I set or I hyper focused on the wrong things (crime) and it became an ongoing cycle. I’ve just recently completed the ADHD Corrections Project, a class for incarcerated men diagnosed with ADHD. I now realize how I was affected by ADHD and that my whole life I developed coping skills to deal with my ADHD. But overall, its an ongoing issue in my life today. I’ve learned new ways to deal with it properly and upon my release I plan to utilize the support provided for people with ADHD. Had I known that ADHD played a part in my continuous display of disregard for the law it would’ve allowed me to seek the help I needed in order to maintain control of my life. Now that I’ve been enlightened I feel confident that I will succeed.”

Stories from Inside: Part 6

February 17, 2014 in Corrections, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

7“Hi, my name is —  and I’m nineteen years old. I was diagnosed with ADHD when I was about nine years old. My parents were concerned about my behavior during school. I used to get in trouble in school for fighting, talking during class, and other things like being hyper. I’m from Philly, also known as Philadelphia. There my parents took me to a doctor to see if they could figure out what was wrong with me, and why I was misbehaving in school. The doctor said I had symptoms of having Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder. From then on both of my parents took me to a therapist company known as PATH and I was placed on medication for my ADHD. I continued going to PATH until I was thirteen: I then moved to Delaware. I began getting in trouble once again, but this time I was involved for selling drugs. A habit that has continued until I was eighteen years old, leading to my incarceration. I’ve learned so much from being in jail and from the ADHD program. There are ways to improve on my behaviors, I have learned better decision-making skills, being aware, and planning for my future. I was attending — College, and I plan on continuing to go back to school, real estate school, and becoming an entrepreneur. I have embraced my attention deficit hyperactive disorder and gained a lot of knowledge about it and myself and I am a better person now. I’m thankful for the opportunity I got from ADHD.”

Stories from Inside: Part 5

February 10, 2014 in Corrections, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

SFI5“When I was in school I was disruptive, even though I got good grades I was always in trouble for acting out. When I got older I started to self-medicate starting with pot then moving on to harder drugs. I always dismissed any symptoms of ADHD as being cause by my drug addiction. In the long run my drug addiction brought me to prison, which I believe was an indirect cause of my ADHD.” 

Stories from Inside: Part 4

February 4, 2014 in Corrections, Pilot Project, Stories From Inside by Kyle Dopfel

We asked participants of the ADHD Corrections Project to share their stories of how ADHD has impacted their lives, and how this might relate to their experience with the criminal justice system. The resulting journal entries, written towards the close of their eight-week group coaching session, were remarkably thoughtful, hopeful, and compelling. While each inmate’s story is unique, we can also recognize in them some of the unfortunate experiences that are all too common among those with ADHD. With the permission of our anonymous authors, we’d now like to share with you these powerful first-person perspectives on the relationship between ADHD and the criminal justice system.

sfi4a“Having ADHD can be very hard on a person. I have ADHD, and I’ve known it for a long time, since I was about 6 or 7 years old. I used to take medicine for it but as I got older I stopped taking it. Since I have been in prison and have been getting help through this ADHD group counseling it has been helping me a lot.”